Productivity : A Quarterly Journal of The National Productivity Council

Published in Association with National Productivity Council

Current Volume: 64 (2023-2024 )

ISSN: 0032-9924

e-ISSN: 0976-3902

Periodicity: Quarterly

Month(s) of Publication: June, September, December & March

Subject: Economics

DOI: 10.32381/PROD

350

Productivity is the principal journal of the National Productivity Council of India. The Journal aims at disseminating information on concepts of and data on productivity and its growth in India and elsewhere. It also aims at disseminating knowledge on techniques and methods of productivity improvement through effective management of all types of resources. Thus contribution from a large spectrum of disciplines are accepted for publication.Only those manuscripts that present original results will be accepted of the publication in the Journal.The managerial/policy implications of the study should be highlighted separately towards the end of the paper.

EBSCO
ProQuest
Genamics (Journalseek)
Indian Citation Index

 

Editor
Rajesh Sund

National Productivity Council, Utpadakta Bhawan, Lodhi Road, New Delhi.


Editorial consultant
Payal Kumar

Editorial Board
S. Gopalakrishnan

Abad Ahmed

N.M. Barot

Vinay Bharat Ram

Ram K. Iyengar

T.S. Papola

N.S. Randhawa

Gourav Vallabh

Volume 64 Issue 4 , (Jan-2024 to Mar-2024)

A Review of Climate Change and Vulnerability Indices of Indian States

By: S. N. Nandy

Page No : 345-354

Abstract
The world has achieved massive economic progress in the past few decades, along with population explosion and rapid urbanization/ industrialization, the effects of which are being realized across the world in the form of global climate change with huge environmental impact. Though climate change is a natural phenomenon, the release of several greenhouse gases (GHGs) into the atmosphere through human activities has made a greater contribution to global warming. The present paper is a review of Indian climate features/ trends and their consequences across the country. Recent countrywide trends in some selected climatic parameters like rainfall and temperature have been depicted. India is an agrarian country and is exposed to various hydro-ecological vulnerabilities, particularly successively occurring, extreme, climatic hazards like drought, flood and cyclone. Based on some indices, possible vulnerable areas due to the effect of climate change have also been depicted. Although the analyses are based on national level secondary data on selected parameters, some region-specific micro-level studies may better reveal the significance of these vulnerabilities. The present paper an attempt to map the climate variability across the nation.

Author :
S. N. Nandy : HARSAC, CCS Haryana Agricultural University Campus, Hisar, Haryana, India.
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/PROD.2024.64.04.1

Price: 251

Climate Related Events and Economic Impacts in India

By: M. Balasubramanian

Page No : 355-364

Abstract
Climate change is one of the most critical socio-economic and environmental problems in India. Although India’s per capita emission is very low compared to other developed nations, the economic impacts are very high as millions depend on climate sensitive sectors for instance, agriculture and forestry etc. Given the above context, this paper discusses the status of climate change, its economic impacts, especially for agriculture and forestry, climate change and financial gaps and other climate policy initiatives in India. In addition, this paper also discusses the four aspects such as climate change and macro-economic impacts, distributional aspects, social cost of carbon, and finally finance and technological aspects. There arises an urgent requirement to conduct a vulnerability assessment for reducing future poverty and inequality associate to climate change in India.

Author :
M. Balasubramanian : Assistant Professor, Centre for Ecological Economics and Natural Resources, Institute for Social and Economic Change, Dr. V. K. R. V. Rao Road Nagarabhavi, Bangalore, karnataka, India.
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/PROD.2024.64.04.2

Price: 251

Climate Change and Indian Food Security: Challenges and Solutions

By: Dhritiman Saha

Page No : 365-373

Abstract
Climate change poses a formidable threat to food security in India, a country with a population of over 1.3 billion people heavily dependent on agriculture for their livelihoods. This paper provides an overview of the challenges and potential solutions for addressing the intersection of climate change and food security in India. The impact of climate change, such as altered precipitation patterns, extreme weather events, rising temperatures, and changing pest and disease dynamics, have profound consequences for Indian agriculture, exacerbating the already existing vulnerabilities within the food system, from smallholder farmers to the overall supply chain. The consequences of a disrupted food supply extend to issues of malnutrition, hunger, and socio-economic instability.
This paper explores various facets of this complex issue such as the specific challenges faced by Indian agriculture due to climate change and the resultant threats to food security, ongoing efforts and potential solutions, including the adoption of climateresilient crop varieties, precision agriculture, and sustainable water management practices, to mitigate these challenges, and the necessity of policy intervention to enhance climate resilience within Indian agriculture.

Authors :
Ranjeet Singh : Principal Scientist and Head - Automation & Sensor Technology Division, ICAR-CIPHET, Ludhiana, Punjab, India.
Dhritiman Saha : Scientist - Automation & Sensor Technology Division, ICAR-CIPHET, Ludhiana, Punjab, India.
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/PROD.2024.64.04.3

Price: 251

Potential Impact of Climate Change on Agricultural Productivity: A Cross Country Analysis

By: Anju Kohli , Deepa Soni

Page No : 374-383

Abstract
Climate change is a spontaneous process which can be observed over a longer duration of time - around ten to fifteen years. It refers to long-term shifts in temperatures and weather patterns. Climate variation has been identified as the major cause of year-to-year fluctuations in agricultural production in both developed and developing countries. The present paper investigates the impact of climate change on agricultural productivity by employing the stochastic frontier production function proposed by Battese and Coelli (1995) with time varying effect using panel data spanning from 1995 to 2022 for four leading agricultural countries - Brazil, China, India and US. The stochastic frontier production function is based on the Cobb-Douglas production function in which agricultural output is regressed on various inputs along with the climate parameter to capture the technical efficiency effects involved in production function. The estimated results suggest that there is a significant negative impact of climate change on agricultural production as well as its technical efficiency. The correlation results also indicate that climate change has a detrimental impact on agricultural output as well as labour productivity. There is need for policies that jointly address sustainable development and climate change. Three broad categories of action are required - cutting emissions, adapting to climate change and financing for required adjustments. Alternative development pathways such as pursuing institutional changes and stimulating clean technology innovations can affect climate change. While excessive government intervention is inadvisable, if climate change is left unchecked, it will be a drag on the economy.

Authors :
Anju Kohli :
Emeritus Professor, Mohanlal Sukhadia University, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India.
Deepa Soni : Assistant Professor, Mohanlal Sukhadia University, Udaipur, Rajasthan, India.
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/PROD.2024.64.04.4

Price: 251

Climate Change and Indian Agriculture: A Critical Review

By: K.S. Kavi Kumar , Anubhab Pattanayak

Page No : 384-392

Abstract
This paper provides a brief review of climate change impacts on Indian agriculture. In addition to discussing the broad insights from various agronomic and economic analyses, the paper elaborates on the treatment of adaptation in impact estimations. The paper also discusses the distributional issues associated with climate change impacts and highlights the implications of climate change impacts on other dimensions such as migration and farmer suicides.

Authors :
K.S. Kavi Kumar : Professor, Madras School of Economics, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.
Anubhab Pattanayak : Assistant Professor, Department of Humanities and Social Sciences, IIT-Kharagpur, Kharagpur, West Bengal, India.
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/PROD.2024.64.04.5

Price: 251

Global Green Credit Initiative and Cooperatives Businesses for Climate Action

By: Sundeep Kumar Nayak , Ayasakanta Mohanty , P. K. Swain

Page No : 393-399

Abstract
Under Green Credit Program launched by the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Government of India, green credits will initially be generated from water conservation and afforestation projects. This is a market-based mechanism to incentivize voluntary environmental actions by various stakeholders including cooperatives. India has about 0.8 million primary level cooperatives working in diverse fields. There are other types of cooperatives at District, Apex and Multi-State levels. The total number of cooperatives of all types is little less than 0.9 million. This paper presents the argument that cooperatives have a big role in the green credit program to fight climate change as an economic activity.

Authors :
Sundeep Kumar Nayak : PhD Scholar, Department of Business Administration, Faculty of IBCS, SoA Deemed to be University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India.
Ayasakanta Mohanty : Professor, Department of Business Administration, Faculty of IBCS, SoA Deemed to be University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India.
P. K. Swain : Professor, Department of Business Administration, Faculty of IBCS, SoA Deemed to be University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha, India.
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/PROD.2024.64.04.6

Price: 251

How the Leather Industry Cluster is Combating Climate Change

By: E. Bhaskaran

Page No : 400-418

Abstract
Sustainable Development Goal 13 deals with climate action. Climate change is a real and undeniable threat to our entire civilization. The objective of this paper is to study: the performance of common effluent treatment plants of the Leather clusters in Ambur and Vaniyambadi in combatting climate change; the efforts made by the Leather cluster towards getting the Leather Working Group (LWG) certification; the effects of the Zero Effect and Zero Defect (ZED) certification; and the efforts made to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 13 on Climate Action in Tamil Nadu. The methodology of the study includes the collection of primary and secondary data from various websites of the Governments of India and Tamil Nadu and also from associations like the Council for Leather Exports, Ambur Economic Development Corporation Limited (AEDOL), Ambur and Vaniyambadi Leather Clusters. The data was analysed using CAGR, descriptive analysis, correlation analysis, regression analysis and structural equation modelling. It was found that the Governments of India and Tamil Nadu, and the SPV of the Leather cluster have been coordinating with each other to mitigate climate change in the leather sector by installing common effluent treatment plants, obtaining the Leather Working Group and the Zero Effect and Zero-Defect certifications, and achieving Sustainable Development Goal 13 on Climate Action and Change.

Author :
E. Bhaskaran : General Manager-Grade-I / Joint Director (Engineering), Department of Industries and Commerce, Government of Tamil Nadu, Tirupattur, Tamil Nadu, India.
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/PROD.2024.64.04.7

Price: 251

Impact of Climate Change on Plant Photosynthesis and Productivity: Threats and Opportunities

By: Anupama Mahato

Page No : 419-429

Abstract
In this era of global climate change, land degradation and biodiversity loss have had significant impact on photosynthesis and productivity of the plant kingdom. The forestry and agricultural sectors also emit greenhouse gases such as CH4 , N2 O etc. which contribute to global warming. On the other hand, forestry and agricultural sectors are most vulnerable and sensitive to climate change, since the growth and productivity of these sectors depend on local climate parameters such as temperature, humidity, rainfall, solar radiation, soil health etc. The impact of climate change events varies regionally. This paper provides an overview of the potential impact of climate change on crop productivity. It also explains in detail the threats and possible opportunities in dealing with the changing climate.

Authors :
Anupama Mahato : Department of Forestry, Wildlife and Environmental Sciences, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya, Chhattisgarh, India.
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/PROD.2024.64.04.8

Price: 251

Assessment of Climate Trends and Carbon Sequestration in a Forest Ecosystem through InVEST

By: Bharath Setturu , T.V. Ramachandra , Tulika Mondal , Paras Negi

Page No : 430-441

Abstract
Carbon sequestration constitutes a vital ecological function executed by ecosystems to mitigate global warming due to the burgeoning sustained anthropogenic activities which release greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, methane, carbon monoxide, etc.). The current study evaluates carbon dynamics in forest ecosystems through the InVest model with temporal land use analyses using remote sensing data from 1973 to 2021 in the Chikamagaluru district of Karnataka. Land use dynamics were assessed using temporal remote sensing data through a machinelearning-based supervised Random Forest algorithm, which shows a decline in forest cover of 28.98%, an increase in agricultural area by 5.31%, and horticulture by 42.52% in the last five decades, which has led to the depletion of carbon stock by 30683.81 Gg. Land use changes have a long-term effect on climatic variables, leading to changes in local temperature, annual rainfall, and number of rainy days in the study area.

Authors :
T.V. Ramachandra : Energy & Wetlands Research Group, Environmental Information System, Center for Ecological Sciences [CES]. Centre for Sustainable Technologies (Astra). Centre for Infrastructure, Sustainable Transportation and Urban Planning [CiSTUP], Indian Institute of Science, Karnataka, India.
Tulika Mondal : Energy & Wetlands Research Group, Environmental Information System, Center for Ecological Sciences [CES].
Paras Negi : Energy & Wetlands Research Group, Environmental Information System, Center for Ecological Sciences [CES].
Bharath Setturu : Energy & Wetlands Research Group, Environmental Information System, Center for Ecological Sciences [CES], Chanakya University, Bangalore, Karnataka, India.
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/PROD.2024.64.04.9

Price: 251

Migration and Global Culture: An Ethnographic Survey in the Context of Migration to the Middle East

By: Mohammed Taukeer

Page No : 442-452

Abstract
There is cordial nexus between migration and culture in the context of globalization. Labour migration from India to the Gulf countries is a consequence of globalization. The present study examines the nexus of migration and culture in the context of labour migration from Uttar Pradesh to the Gulf countries using an ethnographic approach through field work from November 2017 to December 2019 in Uttar Pradesh as the root, Mumbai as the transit destination and the United Arab Emirates as the international destination. The findings from the study show that there is interconnection between internal and international migration because of the culture of migration from Uttar Pradesh to the Gulf via Mumbai. This has resulted in the development of the concept of safe zone of migration.

Author :
Mohammed Taukeer : He is associated as research fellow in the International Institute of Migration and Development, Trivandrum, Kerala, India.
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/PROD.2024.64.04.10

Price: 251

Annual Index of Productivity
Vol. 64 (January 2023 – March 2024)

By: ..

Page No : 453-454

Price: 251