Journal of Psychosocial Research

Current Volume: 18 (2023 )

ISSN: 0973-5410

e-ISSN: 0976-3937

Periodicity: Half-Yearly

Month(s) of Publication: June & December

Subject: Psychology

DOI: 10.32381/JPR

250

Journal of Psychosocial Research (JPR) is a broad-based multidisciplinary scientific peer-reviewed journal. It encompasses various fields of Humanities and Social Sciences such as health, education, technology, philosophy, management, industry, and economics that have psychological implications for social policy and planning. JPR is a peer-reviewed publication, which welcomes empirical and theoretical papers created by researchers and scholars in the field with international quality and standards. It also includes research summaries and book reviews on the relevant subjects.

PsycINFO database of American Psychological Association
EBSCO Publishing (USA)
ProQuest (USA)
Genamics (JournalSeek
)

 

Editor
Dr. Harbans Lal Kaila

Professor of Psychology (retd.)
SNDT Women's University, Mumbai
Director-Forum of Behavioural Safety
Email : kailah1@hotmail.com


Advisory Board
Late Prof. Usha S. Nayar, Mumbai

Prof. Prakash Padakannaya, Mysore

Prof. Jitendra Mohan, Chandigarh

Prof. Ramakrishna Rao, Visakhapatnam

Prof. Sunita Gupta, Amritsar

Prof. J. C. Sharma, Mumbai

Dr. Harish Shetty, Mumbai

Prof. Waseem Alladin, London

Prof. Rajni Sahni, Delhi

 


Prof. A. K. Srivastava, Kanpur

Prof. P. R. Poduval, Cochin

Prof. B. S. Gupta, Varanasi.

Dr. Satish Pai, Mumbai

Prof. Vipin Chilana, Mumbai

Prof. Dr. Asoke Kumar Saha, Bangladesh

Manisha Sawhney, USA

Dr. Updesh Kumar, Delhi

Dr. Meera Shanker, Mumbai

Volume 18 Issue 2 , (Jul-2023 to Dec-2023)

Role of Sport Participation in Youth Experience, Youth Development and Life Satisfaction

By: Shabana Bano , Rajnish Chandra Tripathi , Baby Naushi

Page No : 155-164

Abstract
This study is designed to examine the effect of sport participation in positive youth development, positive youth experience, life satisfaction and psychological problems. A sample of 100 participants age ranged 13-19 years, was recruited from the schools. In order to examine the impact of sport participation, 50 participants were taken from athlete group and 50 from non-athlete group. They were examined using youth development, youth experience, life satisfaction and psychological problem scales. Results showed difference between athlete and non-athlete groups on the youth development, youth experience, life satisfaction and psychological problems. The findings suggest that sport participations promote positive youth experience, positive youth development, enhance life satisfaction and reduce psychological problems.

Authors :
Rajnish Chandra Tripathi : Assistant Professor – Department of Physical Education, Government Girls’ Degree College, DLW, Varanasi.
Baby Naushi : Master Student – Department of Psychology, BHU, Varanasi.
Shabana Bano : Associate Professor – Department of Psychology, BHU, Varanasi
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.1

Price: 101

Conceptualization of Spiritual Intelligence: A Review

By: Vaishali Bendre

Page No : 165-173

Abstract
Spiritual Intelligence is the ability of an individual to approach the higher meanings, values, and unconscious aspects of self and use them to live a richer and more creative life. The purpose of the study is to conceptualize Spiritual Intelligence with the help of views presented by different scholars. For this, descriptive method is used to study SI. Data is collected from various journals, research articles, and books published by different authors. Researchers have stated that spiritual intelligence can be considered as ‘Intelligence of the Soul’. The present study concludes that Spiritual Intelligence (SI) is a need of the 21st Century.

Author :
Vaishali Bendre :
Visiting Faculty – Department of Psychology, MIT WPU and Academic Counsellor, Psychology, IGNOU, Pune
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.2

Price: 101

Students’ Understanding of Mental Health and Coping Skills: Insights from University of Delhi

By: Meenu Anand

Page No : 175-185

Abstact
The expression “mental health” has become ubiquitous as a prominent discourse in the post-pandemic scenario. Mental health as a phenomenon, traverses socio-cultural, economic and geographical borders and nearly most persons can expect to come into contact with its environs (if not its depths). Recent research evidence also points to the increase in feelings of loneliness, alienation and declining social connection and friendships particularly, among youth. Globally young adults are three to four times as likely to struggle with their mental health as their parents’ generation due to the breakdown of ‘social self’ (Sapiens Lab, 2023). This indicates an implosion of relationships, an understanding of self, and an impression of secure encapsulation within a social structure. The present paper is based on research conducted by the author with post graduate students of University of Delhi. It attempts to explore the understanding of mental health among the university students, their sources of stress and coping mechanisms to deal with life challenges. The paper unravels the presence of myths and misconceptions about the understanding of mental health among the students, feelings of loneliness and the shrinking of abilities towards social connection. It concludes by making few recommendations for creating an enabling environment in the university system.

Author :
Meenu Anand : Associate Professor – Department of Social Work, University of Delhi.
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.3

Price: 251

A Study of Peer Victimization among Male and Female Adolescents

By: Rajesh Kumar Jha , Kajal Chaurasia

Page No : 187-194

Abstract
The current study aimed to examine the prevalence of peer victimization among male and female adolescents. Peer victimization is very common phenomenon among adolescents and leads to emotional distress, anxiety, and depression in the life. However, there have been very few studies related to the peer-victimization among male and female adolescents in eastern context. The study was conducted with adolescents aged 16-20 years from Delhi NCR participants. These samples (adolescents) were school and college going of any stream. The study was consisted of 100 adolescents (42 males & 58 females). Multidimensional Peer Victimization Scale (Mynard & Joseph, 2000) was used. Findings reported that there was significant gender difference found on physical victimization, property attacks as well as the aggregate score of peer victimization.

Authors :
Rajesh Kumar Jha : Assistant Professor – Department of Psychology, DAV PG College, B.H.U., Varanasi, U.P.
Kajal Chaurasia : Department of Psychology, DAV PG College, B.H.U., Varanasi, U.P
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.4

Price: 101

Exploring the Relationship between Cyberchondria, Intolerance of Uncertainty, External Health Locus of Control and Defensive Pessimism among Middle-aged Adults

By: Stuti Mehta

Page No : 195-204

Abstract
Information on the Internet is easily accessible and it is common source to look up health related information. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between cyberchondria, intolerance of uncertainty, external health locus of control and defensive pessimism along with exploring the predictors cyberchondria among middle-aged adults. The sample consisted of 120 individuals, 64 females and 56 males, between the age group 40 to 59 years from Mumbai Metropolitan City. Demographic details, Cyberchondria Severity Scale Short Form, Intolerance of Uncertainty Scale, Health Locus of Control scale and Defensive Pessimism Questionnaire were filled by the participants using Google Forms. All variables had a significant positive relationship with each other except for external health locus of control and defensive pessimism. As expected, intolerance of uncertainty, external health locus of control and defensive pessimism independently significantly predicted cyberchondria. Cyberchondria is becoming an important concern. Appropriate intervention strategies can be developed based on these findings.

Author :
Stuti Mehta : Department of Psychology, Maniben Nanavati Women’s College (SNDT University).
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.5

Price: 101

Exploring Environment and Art: A Case Study on Autism

By: Subadra Anand , Akshayee Shetty

Page No : 205-216

Abstract
This study is aimed at gaining an understanding of the school environment of students diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Contrary to the rorschach test which would be a strenuous activity on the subjects, depressurising drawing exercises will be executed, akin to their usual routine. The combination of problems makes it difficult for many spaces and curriculums to provide solutions for individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The arts program at Sense Kaleidoscope trains children in areas of fine arts and dabbles into design and culinary arts as well. In India, the major area of concern for autism is in the skilling space. Could an art centric curriculum enable the autism spectrum to find paths of expression? Will it be a course towards independence for people in the spectrum?

Authors :
Subadra Anand : Researcher, Sense Kaleidoscopes – A Unit of Ayathi Trust and Neurozing, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India
Akshayee Shetty : Founder/Managing Trustee/Director, Sense Kaleidoscopes – A Unit of Ayathi Trust and Neurozing, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India.
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.6

Price: 101

Demographic Correlation between Emotional Intelligence and Life Satisfaction

By: Asoke Kumar Saha , Arunavo Bairagi , Noor Muhammad , Biplob Kumar Dey , Abdur Rahman , Tariqul Islam

Page No : 217-228

Abstract
The study aimed to find a demographic correlation between emotional intelligence and life satisfaction of students of the Chattogram district in Bangladesh. The sample consisted of 160 (80 males and 80 females) students who were selected purposively from the Chottrogram district in Bangladesh. Their age ranges were from 18 years to 25 years. The Bangla version of the Emotional Intelligence Scale (EIS) (Hossain and Uddin, 2008) and the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS) (Ilyas, 2001) were used to measure emotional intelligence and life satisfaction. The findings of the present study showed that female students were significantly more emotional intelligence (t = -4.99, df = 158, p <.001) and life satisfaction (t = -6.24, df = 158, p <.001) than male students. The MS students showed more emotional intelligence (F = 8.18, df = 4, p <.001) and life satisfaction (F = 7.00, df = 4, p <.001) than first, second, third, and fourth-year undergraduate student. Findings also showed that students whose family income was above 30000 taka showed more emotional intelligence (F = 6.84, df = 2, p <.001) and life satisfaction (F = 3.40, df = 2, p <.04) than students whose family income was lower. Finally, a positive correlation (r = .85**, p <.01) was found between emotional intelligence and the life satisfaction. The findings are used to recommend that university authorities should provide, scholarship programs, counseling, and guidance service for a student especially for poor undergraduate students, so that they will be productive citizens.

Authors :
Arunavo Bairagi : Associate Professor – Department of Psychology, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331, Bangladesh.
Biplob Kumar Dey : Associate Professor – Department of Psychology, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331, Bangladesh.
Abdur Rahman : Professor – Department of Psychology, University of Chittagong, 4331, Bangladesh.
Asoke Kumar Saha : Professor – Department of Psychology, Jagannath University, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
Noor Muhammad : Professor – Department of Psychology, Jagannath University, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
Tariqul Islam : Ex-MS Student – Department of Psychology, Jagannath University, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.7

Price: 101

Predictors of Wisdom among Indian Older Adults

By: Roshan Lal Dewangan , Smriti Pathak , Moumee Jesmin

Page No : 229-243

Abstract
While wisdom remains an uncommon trait, it has been sought after by humanity since ancient times. Numerous studies have identified various factors associated with wisdom; however, the collective performance of these correlates and their predictive capabilities remain inadequately explored. This study delved into the predictive potency of frequently recognized correlates of wisdom, encompassing intelligence, personality traits, emotional intelligence, and negative life experiences. The assessment tools employed for measuring wisdom included the self-reported 3D-Wisdom Scale and Wisdom Related Performance (WRP). The study involved the participation of a cohort of 70 older adults aged between 60 and 80 years. Collectively, the assortment of considered factors accounted for a substantial 66% of the variance in WRP. A more in-depth hierarchical analysis revealed that intelligence made the most significant unique and shared contribution, followed by negative life experiences, to the prediction of WRP. Interestingly, when it comes to 3D Wisdom, openness emerged as the sole robust correlate.

Authors :
Roshan Lal Dewangan : Department of Applied Psychology, Kazi Nazrul University, Asansol, West Bengal, India.
Smriti Pathak : Jindal School of Psychology & Counselling, O.P. Jindal Global University, Sonipat, Haryana, India.
Moumee Jesmin : EHSAAS- Feel the Desire of Nature and Society (NGO), Mithani, Paschim Barddhaman, West Bengal, India
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.8

Price: 101

Adjustment Disorder during COVID-19 Pandemic in Indian Women: Case Series

By: Bidita Bhattacharya

Page No : 245-258

Abstract
COVID-19 pandemic wave caused significant impact and uncertainty for people worldwide. The world faced a global health crisis, affecting people in diverse and drastic ways. Women had been affected very differently and suffered from anxiety, depression and stress during that period. In current case series three women with anxiety, depression and stress participated in online platform. Total of 7 sessions were held on online platform between May and June 2020, including initial session, pre and post assessments and therapeutic intervention. Different cognitive behavioural therapeutic techniques, like cost-benefit analysis, distress tolerance, emotion regulation, sleep hygiene and breathing exercises, and safety plans, were used for intervention. Post treatment assessment revealed improvement in anxiety, depression, and stress, which indicate positive outcome of the therapy.

Author :
Bidita Bhattacharya : M.Phil, Ph. D., Associate Professor – Department of Clinical Psychology, Institute of Psychiatry, Kolkata, West Bengal, India
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.9

Price: 101

Adoption of Digital Wallets Among Youth and its Impact on Financial Self Efficacy

By: Abhishek Janvier Frederick , Shabana Mazhar , Nitesh Lal

Page No : 259-269

Abstract
The quality of youth depends upon the level of education, skills, employment, selfefficacy and more over financial self-efficacy. Financial self-efficacy is known to be one of the determinants which influence financial behavior (Noor et al., 2020) which can be instrumental in how well today’s youth are confident in countering economic challenges. Today’s youth belong to a cohort of Generation Z who are labelled as first generation of Digital Natives who have been raised in the era of internet, social networks and mobile phones. Adopting technology comes naturally to them. Digital wallets are one of the technologies which has made roads in dayto-day transactions for today’s masses especially youth. Hence a survey was conducted on 194 respondents in the age category of 15 to 29 to find out the effect on financial self-efficacy of youth because of use of digital wallet and it was found out that there is a significant impact on financial self-efficacy of digital wallet users.

Authors :
Shabana Mazhar :
Associate Professor – Department of Business Studies of Sam Higginbottom University of Agriculture, Technology and Sciences, Prayagraj, Uttar Pradesh, India. Abhishek Janvier Frederick : Assistant Professor – Department of Business Studies of Sam Higginbottom University of Agriculture, Technology and Sciences, Prayagraj, Uttar Pradesh, India.
Nitesh Lal : Scholar of Master of Business Administration – Department of Business Studies of Sam Higginbottom University of Agriculture, Technology and Sciences, Prayagraj, Uttar Pradesh, India
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.10

Price: 101

Critical Challenges in Corporate Safety Culture - 2023 Survey

By: Harbans Lal Kaila

Page No : 271-283

Abstract
Safety culture transformation doesn’t get sustained until it is initiated by the safety professionals, adopted by the HODs, monitored by the site/top management, and reviewed by the company Directors. Companies can assess as to where do they stand on this criteria of safety culture? This paper discusses the challenges of safety culture in terms of: managers deliver speeches on safety but don’t visit the site, safety culture as workplace culture, site Head and HODs, lies in safety culture, minimum safety culture implementation, and gaps in safety culture. Important recommendations are made to overcome the critical challenges in corporate safety culture based on the field visits to almost 48 site locations and interactions with 306 managers. Ground reality of safety culture is different from what is reflected in documents. Hence it is vital to visit site areas by each HOD daily and converse with employees and behavioural safety coordinators of each section/area.

Author :
Harbans Lal : Professor of Psychology (Retd.) – SNDT Women’s University, Director, Forum of Behavioural Safety, Mumbai, India. ORCID 0000-0003-4675-7431

 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.11

Price: 101

Emotional Intelligence and Resilience among Athletes

By: Sri Harsha Bharadwaj S.G , Anagha S

Page No : 285-293

Abstract
Emotions are elaborate reaction patterns made up of sensory, behavioural, and physiological components. Emotional intelligence (EI) is the ability to understand and control emotions as well as their perception, integration, and management. Resilience is the ability to positively respond to a situation. Its components are significant adversity and fruitful adaptation. As a result, resilience can be demonstrated in situations when there is a significant amount of risk, regardless of the industry. Being an athlete means that a person is always competing, going through winning and losing phases, and experiencing a lot of stress during their training period, but they are still expected to return to psychologically normal functioning thereafter. This study measures the ability of athletes to understand their emotions and how well they strike back into the field. There is no significant gender differences across both the variables. Positive correlation is present between Emotional Intelligence and Resilience.

Authors :
Sri Harsha Bharadwaj S.G : IInd year BA Student, Kateel Ashok Pai Memorial College, Shivamogga.
Anagha S : Former Assistant Professor – Dept. of Psychology, Kateel Ashok Pai Memorial College, Shivamogga
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.12

Price: 101

Grit, Self-control and Life Satisfaction Among Indian Classical Dance Performers

By: Sreerenjini P S , Bindu P. Nair , Parvathy Suresh

Page No : 295-308

Abstract
While Indian classical dance forms have remained renowned for their rich heritage, the performers who have played a crucial role in retaining its grandeur despite challenges in their life, have never received the needed recognition. The present study investigated the relationship between grit, self-control and life satisfaction among Indian classical dancers and the possible effects that gender, marital and socioeconomic status may have on these variables. The data (N=194) obtained through on-line surveys, employing standardized instruments, were analyzed using non-parametric tests. A positive relationship between grit, self-control and life satisfaction among dancers was observed, with a gender difference favouring males in life satisfaction. Dancers who are single showed lesser self-control, whereas those divorced, exhibited greater grit. Dancers in the lower socio-economic strata possessed lesser self-control and life satisfaction than those in the upper strata. The severity of life challenges experienced by Indian classical dancers that require immediate redressal is highlighted.

Authors :
Sreerenjini P S : Assistant Professor, Indira Gandhi College of Arts and Science, Nellikuzhi 
Bindu P. Nair : Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Kerala, Thiruvananthapuram
Parvathy Suresh : Junior Research Fellow, DIPR
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.13

Price: 101

Psychosocial Determinant and Quality of Life Among Caregivers of Individuals with Substance Addiction

By: Athira Prasanna , Yukta Sawant , Kakoli Das

Page No : 309-317

Abstract
The psychological effects of substance addiction extend beyond the addicted person onto those who provide care for them. Addiction to drugs or alcohol gives a pleasurable experience to the individual however, it has a negative effect on the ones who cares for them. The purpose of the study is to understand the effect of loneliness and quality of life among the caregivers of individuals with substance addiction. Data was collected from caregivers of substance addicted individuals residing in rehabilitation centers and other mental health centers in Karnataka and Kerala, India. Correlation was performed between emotional and social loneliness in relation to quality-of-life domains such as physical, psychological, social, and environmental. Results show that loneliness has significant effect on quality of life among caregivers. The findings of the study would help to develop plans to include loneliness as a risk factor in addition to other factors such as burden among caregivers.

Authors :
Athira Prasanna : MSc. Clinical Psychology Student – SOSSH, CMR University, Bangalore.
Yukta Sawant : MSc. Clinical Psychology Student – SOSSH, CMR University, Bangalore.
Kakoli Das : Assistant Professor – Dept of Psychology, SOSSH, CMR University, Bangalore.
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.14

Price: 101

Mental Health of Older Adults in Different Living Arrangements: A Socio-demographic Analysis

By: Swati Patra , Pooja Sharma Nath

Page No : 319-333

Abstract
Mental health of older people is influenced by a multitude of factors among which socio-demographic factors play a crucial role (Mahmoodi, Yazdkhasti, Rostami, & Ghavidel, 2022; Kumar et al., 2013). Research (Gautham et al., 2020) indicates an increase in the prevalence of mental disorders in the ageing population in India. Urbanization and changing dynamics of living arrangements for the older people who are living longer now due to improved healthcare system has an impact on their mental health. Hence the present study aims to understand the mental health of urban older people in different living arrangements in the community in terms of the socio-demographic factors. A community based cross sectional research was conducted on the urban older people living alone and living with their adult married children. The study comprised of 164 older married adults (males-92, females-72) between 65-85 years without any chronic disabling illness. A semi-structured interview schedule for sociodemographic details and Mental Health Continuum Short Form (Keyes, 2005) were used in the study. Majority of the urban older participants were reported to have a moderate to high flourishing mental health and none had poor mental health. The older participants living with their adult married children had better mental health than those living alone. Gender difference was also seen in mental health of the urban older adults. Education, financial security, support of family and friends, urban living, absence of chronic disabling medical conditions, and engagement in an active lifestyle were some of the very significant factors found to be associated with mental health. Findings have implications for development of a comprehensive mental health programme for older people living in the community for promoting their well-being.

Authors :
Pooja Sharma Nath : Consultant Clinical Psychologist – Ahmedabad, Gujarat.
Swati Patra : Professor of Psychology – School of Social Sciences, IGNOU, New Delhi.
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.15

Price: 101

Understanding Presence and Nature of Loneliness in Adolescents in Kolkata: An Exploratory Study

By: Susmita Halder , Nilakshi Ghosh

Page No : 335-344

Abstract
Adolescence is a stage in human development which is supposedly filled with excitement, enthusiasm, and one’s own created or imagined external world. The feeling of loneliness could be a subjective experience which may vary from one individual to another. The aim of the present study is to investigate the presence or absence of loneliness in adolescents in Kolkata. Total 100 adolescents, age range of 12-17 of both sexes from nuclear and joint family types were selected. 50 females and 50 males were the participants. The Short-form of University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Loneliness Scale, ULS-8 was used. Results suggest that majority of the adolescents experience loneliness and, majority of the adolescents with loneliness belong to the nuclear family type. Findings also reveal that a greater number of females have reported loneliness as compared to their male counterparts. In conclusion, loneliness in adolescents should be considered and likewise identification, intervention and management should be done.

Authors :
Nilakshi Ghosh : Psychologist – Autism Care, Kolkata.
Susmita Halder : Associate Professor – Department of Psychology, St. Xavier’s University, Kolkata.
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.16

Price: 101

A Study of Emotional Labour, Dissociative Experiences, Depression and Anxiety Among Aviation Staff

By: Sakshi M. Sangekar , Neha Bhansali

Page No : 345-357

Abstract
Despite researchers considering emotional labour as an inevitable component of impression management used in organisations, it can be emotionally demanding and psychologically distressing for aviation staff. The present study utilises the distress model to examine the relationship between emotional labour, dissociative experiences, depression and anxiety among aviation staff. Through purposive sampling technique, the study administered Dutch-Emotional Labour Scale, Brief Dissociative Experiences Scale-Modified and DASS-21 to a total 76 participants aged between 20 to 40 years (M= 29.4); employed as cabin crew (n=45) and ground staff (n=31). Results showed a significant positive relationship between emotional labour and dissociative experiences, were significantly positively correlated with depression and anxiety. However, emotional labour was found to have no significant relationship with depression and anxiety. A strong mediating role of dissociative experiences was found, wherein effects of emotional labour on anxiety and depression is shown to be strongly mediated via dissociative experiences among the participants. This study highlights that urgency to help aviation staff improve their mental health and the requirement to re-examine their working conditions and job demands, while providing preventive mental health care and training can be beneficial.

Authors :
Sakshi M. Sangekar : Master’s in Clinical Psychology – Maniben Nanavati Women’s College, SNDT Women’s University, Maharashtra, India.
Neha Bhansali : Assistant Professor – Postgraduate Department of Psychology, Maniben Nanavati Women’s College, SNDT Women’s University, Maharashtra, India
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.17

Price: 101

The Influence of Online Social Interactions on Mental Health: A Theoretical Analysis

By: Satvinder Singh Saini , Tarsem Singh

Page No : 359-368

Abstract
Social media platforms have permeated modern culture, dramatically influencing how people interact with and view themselves and others. This theoretical analysis explores into the complex association between social media use and mental health, focusing on the complicated interplay between online social interactions and psychological well-being. This article presents a detailed perspective of how social media affects mental health by combining current theoretical frameworks and empirical study findings. The study investigates the positive and negative aspects of social media use, as well as numerous psychological processes and moderators that impact the link between social media and mental health. It also explores the ramifications of these results for people’s mental health and recommends techniques for healthy social media use.

Authors :
Satvinder Singh Saini : Department of Psychiatry, PGIMER, Chandigarh.
Tarsem Singh : Department of Psychiatry, PGIMER, Chandigarh.
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.18

Price: 101

Organizational Citizenship Behaviour in Practice: A Review

By: Roshan Lal Dewangan , Tamaghna Goswami

Page No : 369-383

Abstract
From the traditional concept of “oil your own machine” to the promotion of process of organizational socialization, modern industrial scenario has been changed almost upside down. Several concepts are popping out as a result of this conceptual shift. Organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) is such a concept. Several researchers have been continuously throwing light on this topic with the help of lots of theoretical and empirical literatures. This paper evaluates the existing research findings on OCB and related variables. More specifically, it: (a) explores the conceptual origin of “citizenship” behavior constructs identified in the literature; (b) condense the factual data of the precursors and outcomes of OCBs; (c) seeks relationships with other existing constructs; (d) identifies several interesting directions for future research. Literature review suggests the possibility of future research on the interrelated constructs like OCB, role stress, quality of work life, psychological well-being of the employees in different organizations.

Authors :
Tamaghna Goswami : Research Scholar – Department of Applied Psychology, Kazi Nazrul University, Asansol, West Bengal, India.
Roshan Lal Dewangan : PhD, Assistant Professor – Department of Applied Psychology, Kazi Nazrul University, Asansol, West Bengal, India
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.19

Price: 101

Academic Load of Students and its Impact on Parents Psychological Stress, Anxiety and Depression

By: Asoke Kumar Saha , Arunavo Bairagi , Tariqul Islam , SK. Kamrul Hasan , Fahima Chowdhury Nidhi

Page No : 385-395

Abstract
Current research examines the impact of academic load of the students on parental stress, anxiety and depression levels. The non-probability convenient sampling technique has been used to collect data from 200 participants. Parents were willing to provide information about the school where their children are studying. All the respondents were selected from the parents of the 5th Grade students of Missionaries Schools, Private Schools and Government Primary Schools. All the participants belong to middle class, higher class and lower class as economic status; also make a category according to their gender, monthly income and educational of the parents. Parents of the students were used a modified questionnaire on a five-point Likert scale. This study used questionnaire method to examine the link between stress, anxiety and depression of parents in relation to academic load of student. It was confirmed that academic load of their child and family stress leads to depression among parents, negatively affecting their mental health. This research provides valuable information to parents, educators and other stakeholders concerned about their children’s education and performance on school.

Authors :
Asoke Kumar Saha : Professor – Department of Psychology, Jagannath University, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
Tariqul Islam : MS Student – Department of Psychology, Jagannath University, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
Arunavo Bairagi : Associate Professor – Department of Psychology, University of Chittagong, Bangladesh.
Sk. Kamrul Hasan : Assistant Professor – Department of Business Administration, Fareast International University, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
Fahima Chowdhury Nidhi : MS Student – Department of Psychology, Jagannath University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
 

DOI : https://doi.org/10.32381/JPR.2023.18.02.20

Price: 101